Coastal Hazard Adaption Strategy (CHAS)

Redlands coastline is changing and planning is the key.

As the climate changes, sea levels are set to rise and more intense storms may bring increased storm tide inundation and erosion risks to areas of Redlands Coast currently considered at low or no risk.

With approximately 335 kilometres of coastline and foreshore across Redlands Coast, from Tingalpa Creek at Thorneside south to the mouth of the Logan River and across the Southern Moreton Bay islands and North Stradbroke Island, we have a lot to consider.

Council and private landholders need to think about, and plan for, the changes these coastal hazards can bring over the next 40 to 80 years.

Redland City Council is planning now across an 80 year time horizon, and you are invited on the journey. Learn about the coastal hazards from Council and others, as we navigate the path to adaptation.

The Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy: Part 2 - Emerging Hazards (CHAS) is now under development and is expected to be complete by 2020.

As Council plans for the impacts on public property and assets, private landholders can learn and consider the impacts on their own individual properties and how they can adapt to mitigate the long term implications.

Start planning now

  • Learn about coastal hazards by clicking the links on this site
  • Explore Council’s Red-e-maps to find your property and any related overlays, or
  • Browse the overlay maps on the Redland City Plan site
  • Stay informed by subscribing to project updates

Get involved

  • Click on a yellow pin on the map below to find out what Council knows about erosion at each site.
  • Share your knowledge of an area at risk by dragging and dropping a red pin and/or uploading your photos and comments.

Redlands coastline is changing and planning is the key.

As the climate changes, sea levels are set to rise and more intense storms may bring increased storm tide inundation and erosion risks to areas of Redlands Coast currently considered at low or no risk.

With approximately 335 kilometres of coastline and foreshore across Redlands Coast, from Tingalpa Creek at Thorneside south to the mouth of the Logan River and across the Southern Moreton Bay islands and North Stradbroke Island, we have a lot to consider.

Council and private landholders need to think about, and plan for, the changes these coastal hazards can bring over the next 40 to 80 years.

Redland City Council is planning now across an 80 year time horizon, and you are invited on the journey. Learn about the coastal hazards from Council and others, as we navigate the path to adaptation.

The Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy: Part 2 - Emerging Hazards (CHAS) is now under development and is expected to be complete by 2020.

As Council plans for the impacts on public property and assets, private landholders can learn and consider the impacts on their own individual properties and how they can adapt to mitigate the long term implications.

Start planning now

  • Learn about coastal hazards by clicking the links on this site
  • Explore Council’s Red-e-maps to find your property and any related overlays, or
  • Browse the overlay maps on the Redland City Plan site
  • Stay informed by subscribing to project updates

Get involved

  • Click on a yellow pin on the map below to find out what Council knows about erosion at each site.
  • Share your knowledge of an area at risk by dragging and dropping a red pin and/or uploading your photos and comments.
  • CHAS update

    about 2 months ago

    On Tuesday 23 July, the CHAS steering committee meeting was held. Consultants presented the reports for phases three and four of the strategy that looked at identifying the hazards and assets at risk, respectively. Council and the Local Government Association of Queensland are currently examining the reports.

    The State is also set to review the revised Erosion Prone Area (EPA) mapping. The EPA will replace the current State mapping.



    On Tuesday 23 July, the CHAS steering committee meeting was held. Consultants presented the reports for phases three and four of the strategy that looked at identifying the hazards and assets at risk, respectively. Council and the Local Government Association of Queensland are currently examining the reports.

    The State is also set to review the revised Erosion Prone Area (EPA) mapping. The EPA will replace the current State mapping.



  • Refining EPA mapping

    5 months ago

    Council is in the process of further refining the Coastal Protection (erosion prone areas) Overlay, in consultation with the state Department of Environment and Science (DES), to recognise areas already protected from erosion.

    These include areas protected by natural means (i.e. hard, rocky outcrops) and man-made measures (i.e. revetment walls).

    Once finalised this will feed into Phases 3 and 4 of the CHAS.

    Council is in the process of further refining the Coastal Protection (erosion prone areas) Overlay, in consultation with the state Department of Environment and Science (DES), to recognise areas already protected from erosion.

    These include areas protected by natural means (i.e. hard, rocky outcrops) and man-made measures (i.e. revetment walls).

    Once finalised this will feed into Phases 3 and 4 of the CHAS.

  • Status update

    8 months ago

    Council has completed the Communication and Engagement Plan (CEP) which is Phase 1 of the CHAS. This plan identifies education programs to help Redlands residents understand coastal hazards and their impacts and articulates how and when key stakeholders will be engaged. The Scoping/Gap Analysis (Phase 2) has also been completed which identifies any gaps in Council's knowledge that may be required to move forward with the Strategy.

    At the time of writing, Phases 3 and 4 are estimated to be completed by April 2019. Phase 3 identifies the areas of Redlands Coast exposed to current and future coastal hazards. Phase...

    Council has completed the Communication and Engagement Plan (CEP) which is Phase 1 of the CHAS. This plan identifies education programs to help Redlands residents understand coastal hazards and their impacts and articulates how and when key stakeholders will be engaged. The Scoping/Gap Analysis (Phase 2) has also been completed which identifies any gaps in Council's knowledge that may be required to move forward with the Strategy.

    At the time of writing, Phases 3 and 4 are estimated to be completed by April 2019. Phase 3 identifies the areas of Redlands Coast exposed to current and future coastal hazards. Phase 4 then drills down looking at key assets within those areas that may potentially be impacted.

  • Technical Working Group formed

    11 months ago

    Redland City Council has formed a technical working group made up of key internal stakeholders to ensure technical excellence throughout the development of the CHAS. Members are drawn from asset management, city planning, environment, disaster management, risk management, and strategy and governance.

    Their role is to review each milestone of the CHAS, providing guidance and bringing their professional expertise to the table.

    Redland City Council has formed a technical working group made up of key internal stakeholders to ensure technical excellence throughout the development of the CHAS. Members are drawn from asset management, city planning, environment, disaster management, risk management, and strategy and governance.

    Their role is to review each milestone of the CHAS, providing guidance and bringing their professional expertise to the table.

  • Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy: Part 2- Emerging Hazards

    12 months ago
    Chas process

    The Draft Coastal Adaptation Strategy: Part 1 - Current Hazards is final and was endorsed by Council in December 2016. This work identified those areas on Redlands Coast that are currently subject to erosion, and recommended appropriate and sustainable management of these areas.This report will remain in draft until Part 2 is finalised in 2020.

    The Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy (CHAS): Part 2 - Emerging Hazards is now under development and builds on the existing hazards that were identified in Phase 1. The Strategy development and delivery is overseen by a high-level Coastal Adaptation Steering Committee chaired by Redland City's...

    The Draft Coastal Adaptation Strategy: Part 1 - Current Hazards is final and was endorsed by Council in December 2016. This work identified those areas on Redlands Coast that are currently subject to erosion, and recommended appropriate and sustainable management of these areas.This report will remain in draft until Part 2 is finalised in 2020.

    The Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy (CHAS): Part 2 - Emerging Hazards is now under development and builds on the existing hazards that were identified in Phase 1. The Strategy development and delivery is overseen by a high-level Coastal Adaptation Steering Committee chaired by Redland City's Mayor, which involves senior State Government representatives who provide advice on the progress of the CHAS.

    The Queensland State Government's QCoast 2100: Minimum Standards and Guideline for Queensland Local Governments, underpins the development of this second stage of the Strategy, enabling Councils to focus forward and consider the future coastal hazards and their impacts out to the year 2100.

    QCoast2100 also provides funding through the Local Government Association of Queensland (LGAQ), to facilitate the delivery of the eight-phase process which is outlined in the attached figure.

    Redland City Council is currently completing Phases 3 and 4, and expects the Strategy to be completed by October 2020.

  • June 2018 Update

    over 1 year ago

    From April 2017 to the end of July 2017, Council consulted with local communities and special interest groups about coastal erosion.

    Consultation included distribution of local area maps showing nearby erosion locations, on-site engagement events at key erosion locations, stakeholder briefings and more.

    Council also did surveys to find out how the community used these areas, and identify what the community and stakeholders wanted to see preserved and protected at these locations.

    Feedback ranged across interests and included the need to preserve: easy access to popular beaches, important Indigenous and European heritage sites, infrastructure, and the intertidal zone which is...

    From April 2017 to the end of July 2017, Council consulted with local communities and special interest groups about coastal erosion.

    Consultation included distribution of local area maps showing nearby erosion locations, on-site engagement events at key erosion locations, stakeholder briefings and more.

    Council also did surveys to find out how the community used these areas, and identify what the community and stakeholders wanted to see preserved and protected at these locations.

    Feedback ranged across interests and included the need to preserve: easy access to popular beaches, important Indigenous and European heritage sites, infrastructure, and the intertidal zone which is important for migratory birds.

    Thousands of people participated in the consultation process.

    Community consultation also led to the identification of additional sites, which following assessment may be added to the list of 44 currently recognised erosion prone locations.

    Keep an eye out for the next phase of community consultation, with workshops starting in August 2018.