When can I have my say on the proposed amendment?

    Public consultation will commence following the review of State Interests. It is expected that the review will be completed early in 2022 and community consultation will follow shortly after.

    What are the proposed stronger protections based on?

    The proposed amendment is based on the Wildlife Connections Plan that was adopted by Council in 2018. The Wildlife Connections Plan sets out Council’s policy for the protection of the City’s most important core habitat areas and the wildlife corridor habitat that connects them. The plan sets out the actions needed to implement the outcomes of the Wildlife Connections Plan. The plan includes a priority action to protect existing corridor habitat through the Redland City Plan.

    Does the proposed amendment affect any properties outside the urban footprint?

    The proposed stronger protections on native vegetation clearing only relate to the urban footprint of the City. The amendment does however propose to update the Redland City Plan’s Environmental Significance overlay to reflect the current State mapping of environmental values. This includes changes to the State environmental mapping across the City. It is important to note that the State mapping is already in place and overrides the Redland City Plan mapping of State environmental values.

    Does the proposed amendment exclude any areas of the urban footprint?

    Yes, the proposed amendment does not include areas in the urban footprint that have been subject to a detailed level of ecological investigation and statutory protections for core habitat and wildlife corridors in the Redland City Plan. This includes the Kinross Road Master Plan Area, South East Thornlands Structure Plan Area, Shoreline Master Plan Area, Southern Moreton Bay Islands and the draft South West Victoria Point Local Plan.  

    Land in the centre and industry zones identified in the Redland City Plan have also been excluded as these zones are not considered compatible with delivering viable core habitat or facilitating safe wildlife movements.

    The Priority Development Areas at Toondah Harbour and Weinam Creek are also excluded as these areas are not regulated by the Redland City Plan.

    Do the proposed stronger protections on native vegetation clearing affect private and public properties?

    Yes, the proposed amendment includes parts of both private and public properties that are currently mapped as having State and/or local environmental values and identified in the Wildlife Connections Plan as either core habitat or a wildlife corridor. The proposed amendment identifies all parts of affected private and public properties in a new mapping layer in the Environmental Significance overlay called – Matter of Local Environmental Significance (MLES): Wildlife core and corridor habitat.  

    Do the proposed stronger protections apply to small private properties?

    No, the proposed stronger protections are to only apply to private properties that are 1,000m2 or greater in size. This size is considered to be sufficient to support residential uses on a property and facilitate wildlife movement.

    What do the proposed stronger protections do?

    The stronger protections propose to remove the current Redland City Plan native vegetation clearing exemptions from private and public properties that have mapped State and/or local environmental values and are identified in the Wildlife Connections Plan as either core habitat or a wildlife corridor. This will require approval by Council for all clearing of native vegetation in areas mapped as MLES: Wildlife core and corridor habitat. 

    Has the proposed new MLES: Wildlife core and corridor mapping been verified?

    Each of the parts of private properties proposed to be included in the proposed new MLES: Wildlife core and corridor mapping has been verified to ensure it is located in a wildlife core habitat or corridor as identified in the Wildlife Corridor Plan and contains either state or local environmental values.  

    What will the clearing of native vegetation in areas mapped as MLES: Wildlife core and corridor habitat be assessed against?

    The amendment proposes to include new assessment criteria in the Redland City Plan for the clearing of native vegetation in areas mapped as MLES: Wildlife core and corridor habitat. The new assessment criteria requires that the clearing of native vegetation in mapped areas is firstly, avoided. Where avoidance is not reasonably possible, any clearing of native vegetation needs to be minimised, and if there remains a loss of native vegetation, it would need to be offset with planting.

    What support and assistance is Council considering for affected private landowners?

    Council has provided in-principle support to assist affected private landowners through the existing Environmental Partnerships Program and a rate concession aligned to the Environment Levy in recognition of the contribution that affected private landowners make to the City’s environmental values and the stronger protections that affect their properties.  

    What support is available through the Environmental Partnership Program?

    The Environmental Partnership Program provides a range of support to private landowners to manage environmental values on their properties. The level of support is based on the environmental values of a property and ranges from property management advice to financial assistance with property management. See the Environmental Partnership webpage for further details.