What is the main focus of the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan (the Plan)?

    To reduce waste to landfill by getting organics out of the waste bin and getting more recyclables into the recycling bins. Half of the rubbish that goes to landfill is a mixture of food and garden organics which could be recycled through a green waste bin or home composting. 

    Council provides a good kerbside bin system and services but the overall use, uptake and understanding of what should go in each bin needs improving to treat waste as a resource not bury it in landfill.  

    Another aim of the Plan is to reduce more waste at the source and develop community partnerships for shared action.

    There are four key focus areas of the Redland City Council Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan 2021-2025.

      • Double the number of households with a green waste (lime green lid) bin for garden organics
      • Halve the amount of recyclable material being placed into general waste (red-lid) bins
      • Reduce contamination (non-recyclable materials) in the recycling (yellow lid) bin
      • Ensure everyone knows the importance of using the right bin.

    Why is this plan only for four years instead of longer?

    This Plan has been written in parallel to the development of the Queensland Government’s Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy. The waste and recycling governance, policy and legislation is still evolving towards a zero-waste future and this plan needs to be short term to align with this.

    This plan is the foundation of a thirty year outlook and is designed  to help us get the basics of waste reduction and recycling right as an initial phase for developing a circular economy. 

    Why are we seeking feedback on the Plan?

    We are seeking feedback from our community on the proposed action items and how we can collectively meet the waste reduction and recycling targets.  Feedback will be used to inform the final Plan which we aim to present to Council in the second half of this year.

    Will the service levels change as a result of this Plan?

    This Plan has been written in parallel to the development of the Queensland Government’s Waste Management and Resource Recovery Strategy. The waste and recycling governance, policy and legislation is still evolving towards a zero-waste future and this plan needs to be short term to align with this.

    This plan is the foundation of a thirty year outlook and to help us get the basics of waste reduction and recycling right as an initial phase of developing a circular economy. 

    Why doesn’t Council provide a larger green waste bin?

    Council has investigated the options of a larger green waste bin. Unfortunately, the additional collection cost of a larger green waste bin is prohibitive compared to getting two green bins.

    Why did you change the name from Waste Transfer Stations to Recycling and Waste Centres (RaWCs)?

    There are a number of reasons for the name change. Over two thirds of materials managed at these facilities are recyclables that are temporarily stored until being sent to various recycling facilities in South East Queensland. The renaming also aligns more closely with the Queensland Government and Council’s 30-year target of zero waste to landfill and also brings us more closely in line with other local government naming conventions of their waste and recycling facilities.

    When is Council planning to offer a FOGO (Food Organics Garden Organics) service?

    FOGO collection requires significant behaviour change and education. It also costs more and results in higher waste and recycling utility charges (on your rates). During the next four years, Council’s focus will be to encourage residents to get a green waste bin, which diverts garden organics away from landfill and turns them into nutrient-rich soil products. Up to 30% of all household waste sent to landfill is garden organics, while food waste makes up about 18% of household waste sent to landfill. 

    Households will need to improve source separation and achieve clean and uncontaminated waste streams to enable processing into a horticultural product that can be sold to markets. Council will continue to investigate and undertake a cost-benefit analysis into future FOGO collections for Redlands Coast residents and how any local FOGO system can be supported at the SEQ regional level.

    Will Council plan to offer a green waste bin collection service to island residents??

    Council is committed to investigating all options to divert green waste away from landfill. We are seeking expressions of interest from island residents who would like to be considered to participate in a voluntary green waste collection service on the islands.  

    There is an opportunity for small scale, low-cost solutions on the islands to be further explored to minimise off-island transport. These include community garden composting programs.

    Why aren’t green waste bins offered free as part of my rates?

    The green waste bin service is an opt-in service offered to residents who produce green waste at their home or business and can’t or don’t want to take it to the Recycling and Waste Centres. Recycling creates jobs, and there is an additional cost to collect the green bins by using two extra trucks and the drivers for those trucks. There are also costs involved in the processing and composting of the green waste.

    Why doesn’t Council offer a rebate for re-usable nappies?

    As part of the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan, Council is looking into incentive programs, for example one for residents who purchase and use re-usable nappies.

    Why don’t you offer a rebate for compost bins like other councils?

    As part of the draft Waste Reduction and Recycling Plan, Council will be investigating a rebate to residents for taking up a compost bin. Further information will be made available as this project continues.

    What can I do to reduce my waste at home now?

    There are some things you can easily implement to reduce your waste.

    • Go green and get a green waste bin, if you don’t already have one.  Using a green waste bin is an easy and convenient way to ensure your garden waste is recycled and doesn’t end up in your general waste bin and eventually landfill.
    • Don’t stop recycling!  Did you know that the bathroom is the second most wasteful room in the house?  Have a look around your bathroom – no doubt you have shampoo and conditioner bottles, hairspray and other aerosol tins, and liquid soap containers.  These can all be recycled!  So too can metal tins and cans (yes including that tin of dog food), glass bottles and jars (from that 'spag bol' you made the other night) and paper and cardboard from Friday night’s pizza night!  
    • Knowing what goes in each bin is crucial – if you’re not sure check out Council’s Household Waste and Recycling Quick Guide.   It contains a monumental list of regular household items and how to dispose of them.
    • Smart Shopping – stop the rot! Planning your weekly meals and being mindful about your grocery shop can help avoid food waste and save money. Setting a realistic meal plan allows you to buy only what you need.   Before you go shopping, take a look in your fridge and cupboards to see what you already have. Avoid unnecessary promotions on fresh foods. Read up on food storage and preparation to make sure all that hard work and money doesn’t go to waste. Check out the new Stop Food Waste Australia website for more helpful hints and ideas.
    • Composting - can you dig it? For families who generate a little more food waste, compost is a great way to help create new or improve existing garden beds. You can purchase a compost bin from your local hardware store or you can make your own.   For smart tips on how to maintain your compost visit Council’s Create your own compost page.                    
    • Have you got worms?  A worm farm reduces your environmental footprint because you are removing organic waste from landfill.  Worm farms are suitable for smaller families or individuals and they love most fruit and vegetable food scraps – they even like tea/coffee, egg shells and hair!  Most hardware stores stock worms and worm farms and are happy to give advice around setting up your worm farm.  There’s also a wealth of knowledge on what to feed the worms and how to keep them happy - visit Council’s Create your own worm farm page.

    How can I reduce my waste at the RaWCs?

    The easiest way to reduce waste going to landfill is to sort your load before your visit the Recycling and Waste Centre. Before loading your vehicle, think about what you’re dropping off. Segregate your landfill waste and your recyclables so that when you arrive at the RaWC’s, it will be much easier to dispose of your items. Get familiar with the site layout and where each recyclable material should be placed in addition to the general waste bins.

    Where does my household yellow-lid recycling go?

    Redlands Coast has six dedicated recycling trucks collecting over 12,000 tonnes of plastic, aluminium and steel, glass, paper and cardboard from kerbside recycling bins each year. All of it is transported to the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) at Murarrie, where it is manually screed for large contamination and waste items before being processed by advanced mechanical sorting technology. Once processed, your recycling material is then either used in re-manufacturing right here in Australia or otherwise sold for recycling locally or overseas.

    As sophisticated as the machinery is, it still can’t remove all contaminants, so it’s vital that soft plastics (bags/wrapping etc.), polystyrene and other general waste be kept out of your yellow-lid recycling bin.