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Coastal Erosion and Management - Redland City


As a coastal city with approximately 220 kilometres of coastline across bay and island landscapes, Redland City is particularly influenced by natural coastal processes.


Natural and human influences
The natural processes shaping coastlines are very dynamic with changes to coastal environments constantly occurring through the influence of tides, waves, floods, storms and cyclones and changes in sea level. In some cases human activities or structures also have an impact on the dynamics of our coastlines.


Coastal values
The environmental, social and economic values of the coast are key factors in attempts by State and local governments in coastal communities to identify and address coastal erosion and hazards.
In parts of the Redlands, the historical change of the shoreline is sometimes dramatic with significant portions of land in both public and private ownership lost to the sea over the past century or more. The natural influences behind these changes are continuing.


Planning
State and Local Government planning instruments already take into account coastal flood and storm tide inundation mapping and predictions of future sea level rise. The policy of retreat has been a common response to coastal erosion.

However, Council acknowledges the need to identify and formally manage areas of coastal erosion impacting on specific communities through the development of coastal management and adaptation plans. While acknowledging the priority of Amity Point, North Stradbroke Island , Council is also working to develop objective assessment criteria to determine remaining areas of coastal management priority across the city.


Coastal Management
Council has committed to developing coastal management plans with the advice of senior levels of government and where appropriate, in direct consultation with specifically affected communities. This includes the establishment of the Coastal Adaptation Steering Committee comprising senior Government, Council and Stakeholder organisation representatives and the establishment of the Amity Point SEMP Reference Group (recognising both state and local priority given to erosion issues at Amity Point).


As a coastal city with approximately 220 kilometres of coastline across bay and island landscapes, Redland City is particularly influenced by natural coastal processes.


Natural and human influences
The natural processes shaping coastlines are very dynamic with changes to coastal environments constantly occurring through the influence of tides, waves, floods, storms and cyclones and changes in sea level. In some cases human activities or structures also have an impact on the dynamics of our coastlines.


Coastal values
The environmental, social and economic values of the coast are key factors in attempts by State and local governments in coastal communities to identify and address coastal erosion and hazards.
In parts of the Redlands, the historical change of the shoreline is sometimes dramatic with significant portions of land in both public and private ownership lost to the sea over the past century or more. The natural influences behind these changes are continuing.


Planning
State and Local Government planning instruments already take into account coastal flood and storm tide inundation mapping and predictions of future sea level rise. The policy of retreat has been a common response to coastal erosion.

However, Council acknowledges the need to identify and formally manage areas of coastal erosion impacting on specific communities through the development of coastal management and adaptation plans. While acknowledging the priority of Amity Point, North Stradbroke Island , Council is also working to develop objective assessment criteria to determine remaining areas of coastal management priority across the city.


Coastal Management
Council has committed to developing coastal management plans with the advice of senior levels of government and where appropriate, in direct consultation with specifically affected communities. This includes the establishment of the Coastal Adaptation Steering Committee comprising senior Government, Council and Stakeholder organisation representatives and the establishment of the Amity Point SEMP Reference Group (recognising both state and local priority given to erosion issues at Amity Point).

  • November 2016 update

    about 1 year ago

    Council has been working closely with the Amity Point community for the last two years on developing a shoreline erosion management plan. A key supporting study has now been completed, being a geophysical investigation of the rock armouring at Amity Point. This work further complements the hydrographic survey completed in late 2015 and enables a more informed assessment of the Amity Point shoreline.

    While the SEMP is near completion a progress report has been prepared outlining the emerging management options based on the work completed to date. While this report is important, it is important to note it is not...

    Council has been working closely with the Amity Point community for the last two years on developing a shoreline erosion management plan. A key supporting study has now been completed, being a geophysical investigation of the rock armouring at Amity Point. This work further complements the hydrographic survey completed in late 2015 and enables a more informed assessment of the Amity Point shoreline.

    While the SEMP is near completion a progress report has been prepared outlining the emerging management options based on the work completed to date. While this report is important, it is important to note it is not the final report or an implementation plan.

    Council will be hosting an event early 2017 to present and explain the outcomes of these studies to the Amity Point Community and to continue to engage the community in the development of a shoreline erosion management plan based on these and other studies. In recognition of strong community interest in the meantime, all supporting reports and studies have been made available in the document library.

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