Southern Moreton Bay Islands Ferry Terminal Upgrade Project

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The Southern Moreton Bay Islands Ferry Terminal Upgrade Project has been in planning by Council and TransLink (a division of the Department of Transport and Main Roads) since 2014.

Council and the department are working in partnership to deliver the upgrade of the Russell, Macleay, Lamb, and Karragarra Island ferry terminals in consultation with island communities, Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, SeaLink, and other key stakeholders to explore their requests and plan suitable ferry terminal design options.

The project will involve replacing the existing Russell Island jetty, as well as repurposing and replacing the gangways and pontoons on Russell, Macleay, Lamb, and Karragarra Islands. The project will ensure the new ferry terminals are compliant with the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002 requirements made under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

The existing ferry pontoons will be repurposed for recreational use such as fishing and mooring.

Find out more and get involved

  • Check out the ferry terminals' 3D images and screen artwork
  • Watch the preliminary design video
  • Read through our resources and news feed
  • Subscribe to receive project updates straight to your inbox

The Southern Moreton Bay Islands Ferry Terminal Upgrade Project has been in planning by Council and TransLink (a division of the Department of Transport and Main Roads) since 2014.

Council and the department are working in partnership to deliver the upgrade of the Russell, Macleay, Lamb, and Karragarra Island ferry terminals in consultation with island communities, Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation, SeaLink, and other key stakeholders to explore their requests and plan suitable ferry terminal design options.

The project will involve replacing the existing Russell Island jetty, as well as repurposing and replacing the gangways and pontoons on Russell, Macleay, Lamb, and Karragarra Islands. The project will ensure the new ferry terminals are compliant with the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002 requirements made under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

The existing ferry pontoons will be repurposed for recreational use such as fishing and mooring.

Find out more and get involved

  • Check out the ferry terminals' 3D images and screen artwork
  • Watch the preliminary design video
  • Read through our resources and news feed
  • Subscribe to receive project updates straight to your inbox
  • May 2017 update

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    by emma, 30 May 2017
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    Progress has been made on the SMBI Ferry Terminal project,

    What we have done:

    • SMBI ferry terminal users and stakeholders consulted on their thoughts on the existing terminals.
    • A design brief incorporating community and key stakeholder input was prepared.
    • Invitations to tender for design services were issued.
    • Tenders were evaluated and designers appointed.
    • Design concepts prepared.
    • Key stakeholders consulted on the design concepts.
    • Revised design concepts incorporating stakeholder feedback were prepared and costed.

    What we are doing now:

    • Business cases in support of funding applications to Council and the state are being prepared.

    What’s next?

    • Funding applications will be made to Council and the State Government.
    • On approval of upgrades which can be funded, the community will be consulted on the design concepts.
    • Revised ‘preliminary’ designs incorporating community feedback will be prepared.
    Have a question about the update? Ask away!

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  • November 2016 update

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    by emma, 29 Nov 2016

    Since February 2016, Council and its project partner, the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR), have been consulting with island communities and other ferry terminals users on what they like and dislike about the existing terminals, and what they think the upgraded terminals should do, and look like.

    Much of the feedback included a desire for better protection from the weather and wider gangways for improved access. View feedback received.

    Armed with an understanding of what ferry terminal users wanted, Council and DTMR invited some of the country’s best architectural design and engineering firms to bid for the concept design contract. Following a 12-week tender and evaluation process, a design partnership between engineering and architectural firms Cardo and Architectus was appointed. View the media release.

    When developed, the design concepts will not only help Council prepare a business case to apply for funding for the upgrades, they will also be given to the community for feedback.

    Community consultation will be widely advertised, or be the first to know and register to receive updates.

  • What you have told us so far

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    by jon.guarna, 13 Apr 2016
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    We've been talking to Southern Moreton Bay Islands (SMBI) residents about the upgrade of the ferry terminals on Russell, Macleay, Lamb and Karragarra islands.

    This is some of what you have said you would like to see.

    Ferry terminals should provide protection from the weather

    • The ferry terminals should provide protection from the southeast rain and wind.
    • The ferry terminals should provide protection from the sun.
    • Gutters are needed to stop rain running off the roof and blowing onto users queuing on the ferry terminal's jetties, gangways and pontoons.
    • The roofing between pontoons, gangways, jetties and the land shelters should be unbroken so users can pass from shore to boat without getting wet.
    • Land shelters should be large enough to accommodate the growing number of users of the ferry terminals.
    • Protection from the elements should not come at the cost of lost views or breezes.

    Jetties and gangways should be wider

    • The jetties and gangways need to be wider to deal with the uses and number of users of the ferry terminals. There needs to be sufficient room for queuing on and off the ferries, as well as sufficient room for passing of people with trolleys, dogs, prams, 'carry on freight', and people in wheelchairs or scooters.

    Pontoons should be bigger

    • The pontoons need to be wider to deal with the uses and number of users of the ferry terminals. For instance, those with mobility issues would ideally make their way to the pontoon to wait in close proximity to where the boat arrives, but at present there is insufficient room, seats or shelter.

    Ferry terminals should be safe to use

    • The yellow dimpled floor tiles (for the sight impaired) are slippery when wet, difficult to push wheel chairs over and capture wheels in their ruts.
    • The rocking of the pontoon can make it difficult for those with mobility issues to wait in close proximity to where the boat arrives.
    • The gangway slope can be difficult for those with mobility issues, particularly those using wheeled walking frames - who can struggle to control their descent down gangways.

    Ferry terminals should be safe places to be

    • Installation of a phone (or other audio hook up) to police would improve the feeling of personal security at the ferry terminals.
    • Better lighting and a CCTV security camera with a 'safe zone' in camera frame would also help.

    Ferry terminal users should be comfortable

    • More seating (protected from the weather) is needed to deal with the number of users of the ferry terminals.
    • Seating should be comfortable.

    Ferry terminals should look good

    • The ferry terminals should look good, they're what visitors and residents first see when they come to the islands.
    • Less attractive facilities, like bins for example, should be repositioned to less visually prominent places.
    • The design and materials used in the upgrades of the ferry terminals should be in keeping with the character of the islands.
    • The mosaics should be incorporated more effectively into the upgraded terminals.

    Features that ferry terminal users would like considered in the upgrade

    • A water bubbler
    • A fire hydrant
    • Access to water (and hose) for cleaning of decking
    • Fish cleaning bench and sink
    • More bins
    • Dog tidy bags and bins
    • Lockers
    • Signage that better identifies each of the islands
    • Better tourist information boards or facilities
    • Somewhere to tie up boats
    • Somewhere to lock up bikes
    • Somewhere out of the weather to lock up mobility scooters
    • Somewhere to top up Go cards
    • A drink vending machine
    • Free Wi-Fi
    • Separate male and female toilets in close proximity to the terminal
    • See through screening enabling passengers to see the ferry from the shelter

    Other potential ferry terminal uses

    • Somewhere to fish. Many islanders believe islanders need somewhere to fish, but all dislike the mess and smell that those fishing leave.
    • Somewhere for foreshore business activities - like cafes, kiosks and pump out facilities to attract passing boaties.
    • Somewhere to show local art.

    Related issues

    • Population growth and changing demographics are putting increasing pressure on car arking, disabled car parking and drop off and pick up zones.
    • Limited transport options are exacerbating existing access issues experiences by the aged and those with mobility issues.
    • The high volume of vehicular traffic (heavy vehicles using the barge, buses, taxis and cars dropping off and picking up) mixing in a small area with pedestrians, including many children, requires good traffic and pedestrian planning and management.

    Issues specific to the Russell Island ferry terminal

    • Length of the jetty makes access to the ferries difficult for those with mobility issues, or those carrying 'freight' (for which the trolley was historically used).
    • A fire hydrant is needed half way up the jetty.

    Issues specific to the Karragarra Island ferry terminal

    • The character of the island should be reflected in the design and materials used in the construction of the ferry terminal.
    • Lighting at the terminal needs to be improved.

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