Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy

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Planning for the future of Redlands Coast.

Redland City is blessed with 335 kilometres of coastline and foreshore areas, from Tingalpa Creek at Thorneside south to the mouth of the Logan River and across the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). It has a rich and long history and is the traditional and spiritual home of the Quandamooka People.

The coastal zone has significant ecological value and includes Ramsar listed sites and parts of the Moreton Bay Marine Park. Moreton Bay (Quandamooka) provides a habitat for a diverse range of unique plants, and animals including rare, vulnerable, and endangered species such as migratory shorebirds, frogs, dugongs, and turtles.

The coastal environment also holds significant recreational, commercial, and eco-cultural tourism value. The region is renowned for scuba diving, boating, and recreational and commercial fishing. These values have seen Redlands Coast become a popular place for us to live and work and is home to more than 160,000 residents, many of who live adjacent to or within proximity to the coastline.

Redlands Coast experiences regular impacts associated with storm events resulting in erosion and tidal inundation of low-lying areas.

Council is being proactive and developing a long-term comprehensive plan known as the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy to:

  • identify coastal hazard areas
  • understand vulnerabilities and risks to a range of assets and values
  • engage with the community to understand their preferred approach to adaptation
  • determine the costs, priorities, and timeframes for their implementation.

Find out more and get involved

  • Download Council's Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy by clicking here
  • Read the project fact sheets
  • Register to receive future updates
  • Click on a yellow pin on the erosion map below to find out what Council knows about erosion at each site
  • Share your knowledge of an area at risk by dragging and dropping a red pin and/or uploading your photos and comments
  • Explore Council’s Red-E-Maps to find your property and any related overlays, or browse the overlay maps on the Redland City Plan site

Planning for the future of Redlands Coast.

Redland City is blessed with 335 kilometres of coastline and foreshore areas, from Tingalpa Creek at Thorneside south to the mouth of the Logan River and across the Southern Moreton Bay Islands and North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). It has a rich and long history and is the traditional and spiritual home of the Quandamooka People.

The coastal zone has significant ecological value and includes Ramsar listed sites and parts of the Moreton Bay Marine Park. Moreton Bay (Quandamooka) provides a habitat for a diverse range of unique plants, and animals including rare, vulnerable, and endangered species such as migratory shorebirds, frogs, dugongs, and turtles.

The coastal environment also holds significant recreational, commercial, and eco-cultural tourism value. The region is renowned for scuba diving, boating, and recreational and commercial fishing. These values have seen Redlands Coast become a popular place for us to live and work and is home to more than 160,000 residents, many of who live adjacent to or within proximity to the coastline.

Redlands Coast experiences regular impacts associated with storm events resulting in erosion and tidal inundation of low-lying areas.

Council is being proactive and developing a long-term comprehensive plan known as the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy to:

  • identify coastal hazard areas
  • understand vulnerabilities and risks to a range of assets and values
  • engage with the community to understand their preferred approach to adaptation
  • determine the costs, priorities, and timeframes for their implementation.

Find out more and get involved

  • Download Council's Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy by clicking here
  • Read the project fact sheets
  • Register to receive future updates
  • Click on a yellow pin on the erosion map below to find out what Council knows about erosion at each site
  • Share your knowledge of an area at risk by dragging and dropping a red pin and/or uploading your photos and comments
  • Explore Council’s Red-E-Maps to find your property and any related overlays, or browse the overlay maps on the Redland City Plan site
  • Refining EPA mapping

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    Council is in the process of further refining the Coastal Protection (erosion prone areas) Overlay, in consultation with the state Department of Environment and Science (DES), to recognise areas already protected from erosion.

    These include areas protected by natural means (i.e. hard, rocky outcrops) and man-made measures (i.e. revetment walls).

    Once finalised this will feed into Phases 3 and 4 of the CHAS.

  • Status update

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    Council has completed the Communication and Engagement Plan (CEP) which is Phase 1 of the CHAS. This plan identifies education programs to help Redlands residents understand coastal hazards and their impacts and articulates how and when key stakeholders will be engaged. The Scoping/Gap Analysis (Phase 2) has also been completed which identifies any gaps in Council's knowledge that may be required to move forward with the Strategy.

    At the time of writing, Phases 3 and 4 are estimated to be completed by April 2019. Phase 3 identifies the areas of Redlands Coast exposed to current and future coastal hazards. Phase 4 then drills down looking at key assets within those areas that may potentially be impacted.

  • Technical Working Group formed

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    Redland City Council has formed a technical working group made up of key internal stakeholders to ensure technical excellence throughout the development of the CHAS. Members are drawn from asset management, city planning, environment, disaster management, risk management, and strategy and governance.

    Their role is to review each milestone of the CHAS, providing guidance and bringing their professional expertise to the table.

  • Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy: Part 2- Emerging Hazards

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    The Draft Coastal Adaptation Strategy: Part 1 - Current Hazards is final and was endorsed by Council in December 2016. This work identified those areas on Redlands Coast that are currently subject to erosion, and recommended appropriate and sustainable management of these areas.This report will remain in draft until Part 2 is finalised in 2020.

    The Coastal Hazards Adaptation Strategy (CHAS): Part 2 - Emerging Hazards is now under development and builds on the existing hazards that were identified in Phase 1. The Strategy development and delivery is overseen by a high-level Coastal Adaptation Steering Committee chaired by Redland City's Mayor, which involves senior State Government representatives who provide advice on the progress of the CHAS.

    The Queensland State Government's QCoast 2100: Minimum Standards and Guideline for Queensland Local Governments, underpins the development of this second stage of the Strategy, enabling Councils to focus forward and consider the future coastal hazards and their impacts out to the year 2100.

    QCoast2100 also provides funding through the Local Government Association of Queensland (LGAQ), to facilitate the delivery of the eight-phase process which is outlined in the attached figure.

    Redland City Council is currently completing Phases 3 and 4, and expects the Strategy to be completed by October 2020.

    Figure 1: CHAS Eight Phase Process

  • June 2018 Update

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    From April 2017 to the end of July 2017, Council consulted with local communities and special interest groups about coastal erosion.

    Consultation included distribution of local area maps showing nearby erosion locations, on-site engagement events at key erosion locations, stakeholder briefings and more.

    Council also did surveys to find out how the community used these areas, and identify what the community and stakeholders wanted to see preserved and protected at these locations.

    Feedback ranged across interests and included the need to preserve: easy access to popular beaches, important Indigenous and European heritage sites, infrastructure, and the intertidal zone which is important for migratory birds.

    Thousands of people participated in the consultation process.

    Community consultation also led to the identification of additional sites, which following assessment may be added to the list of 44 currently recognised erosion prone locations.

    Keep an eye out for the next phase of community consultation, with workshops starting in August 2018.


Page last updated: 15 September 2021, 15:32